Project: Stay

Note: This is a longer post, but you can just scroll through the pictures if you’re in a hurry!

Finally, finally, I was inspired to complete a piece. In the past, I haven’t given much thought to what I’m drawing. I was just imitating what I saw, usually something that looked pretty or interesting to me. This time, I actually had a specific idea and planned it out. The project ended up a little differently from the way it started in my mind, but I like where it went. This was a challenge for me in that I ventured away from the reference, inventing a scene through the window and changing up the placement and type of wood for the table and window frame. I took more pictures than usual because I wanted to show some more of my layering process.

This is not a self-portrait, per se, but I did have my husband take a photo of me that I used as a reference. I do see some of myself in her (at least, how I see myself). I drew my initial sketch using a 4H graphite pencil. After I took the picture below, I erased as much of the graphite as I could, particularly in places where I knew I would be using light colors.


First I put down some light layers, starting with the main figure.


I probably should have taken another picture or two in between these stages, but when I get going I sometimes forget. I used a few different shades of brown for the hair, leaving lighter areas which I then blended with White to achieve the highlights. I rarely use straight Black pencil but I thought it appropriate for the pupil. I knew what color I wanted the wall to be at this point, but hadn’t yet made a plan for the table or the window. This is always a problem for me when I create projects in my mind that aren’t entirely based on something I’m looking at: I get excited, get started, and then am left to complete the concept at the last minute, often unsatisfactorily.


At this point, while I wasn’t quite ready to work on the window, I dove in anyway. I knew that the view through the window, while not the central focus of the drawing, was nevertheless significant. I didn’t want something too mundane, or unattractive and therefore distracting. I practiced blending some colors on a scrap paper and liked the effect I came up with, which reminded me of an abstract version of how it might look through the window of a moving train. This actually took the idea in a slightly different direction and helped me come up with the title. Again, I started with light layers of the base colors I wanted to use.


Then I layered additional colors and blended with my colorless blender left to right until I achieved the desired effect. Honestly, I had been hoping to create a warmer feeling, but it shouldn’t be all that surprising that I didn’t succeed considering I used so many cool colors. I’m not entirely happy with how this aspect of the drawing turned out, as it wasn’t what I had imagined at the beginning. But to be realistic, I hadn’t made much of a plan for that part anyway. I had decided that I wanted a watercolor effect (without the watercolors, which I am not practiced with and feared would drip down and ruin what I already had). I am glad that I took a risk and did something a little abstract, which is totally new for me.


Now, I had come to the stage where I needed to make a few more decisions. I had originally imagined dark wood for the table and the window frame, but I realized that this would make a whole lot of the drawing dark brown, and be noticeable for the wrong reason. I settled on a lighter wood for the table (vaguely reminiscent of oak) and a darker wood for the window frame. This was my first light layer of color for the table and window frame. I did look online at different types of wood to get a slightly more realistic idea of what the colors might look like. I also realized that I had given no indication that the scene was being viewed through a window so I went in with White to suggest some reflections on the glass.


Second layer of color:


Even more layers of color:


Next, I blended everything out with colorless blender pencil and added a shadow to the table (there’s that warmth I wanted! Although I later realized the placement of the shadow is probably way off from where it should be, depending on the actual angle of the window and the light coming in).


Finally, I made some minor adjustments and put on the finishing touches, like filling in any blank spaces with white (when you skip this step, the drawing tends to look slightly incomplete). I added some more color to the eye, darkened the pupil, and added a tiny bit of pink on the cheeks. I also fixed a few hairs, added/ enhanced some shadows, and completed the hand. This was one area that frustrated me because the shadows came out too dark and I couldn’t lighten them enough with White/ blending. However, I think it is still an improvement over the ghostly hand in the previous stages.

StayStay, colored pencil on Bristol paper, 2018 (11×14)

I don’t know how realistic this drawing ultimately is in terms of proportions and shading, but I like that I came up with the idea and actually drew it. It mostly fits with my usual style, which I think is a little reserved/ conservative (clean, straight lines, aiming for realism), but veers away in the sense that I drew partially from my imagination. I’ve still got some work to do as far as the colored pencils go. For example, even though I used my drafting brush excessively to clear away debris, I still got some clumps of pencil stuck in the paper, particularly on the table.

I don’t want to do too much explaining about the piece, because I don’t want to take away the enjoyment of letting the picture mean whatever it might mean to you, but I’m happy to answer any of your questions.

One thought on “Project: Stay

  1. Inventing my own scene is out of my comfort zone too and it’s definitely something I want to do more of. It’s hard to take the time and work up the courage to take on something this daunting. So it’s very encouraging for me to see you tackling this 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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