Sketch: Red Onion

Colors used (all Prismacolor Premier):

Dark Purple
Dark Umber
Crimson Red
Pink
Light Peach
Indigo Blue
50% Warm Gray
White

For this sketch, I did something I almost never do: I started over. Even though I was almost finished, I wasn’t happy with how it turned out. Usually at that point I just give up and move on to something else. But for some reason this time I gave it a second chance.

I drew the first version on recycled sketchbook paper with a medium tooth. It was very hard to layer enough color to mask the white flecks of paper showing through, even after blending multiple times. I’m sure that the paper was part of my difficulty. Another problem was that I forgot to leave the paper blank in areas of highlight. It’s very easy to get coloring and go right over places that were supposed to be light or white. This leaves the sketch looking one-dimensional. The first sketch:

IMG_3227

For the second sketch, I used my Mixed Media paper, which has a smoother vellum surface. This took the color so much better. I still had to do a lot of layering and blending, but it was a lost less frustrating. I will have to try to find a similar paper that costs less for when I’m just practicing.

My initial sketch was very similar to the first sketch but there were slight variations (one being that I centered it better on the page).

IMG_3221

I started off by making an underpainting with Dark Umber to get a feel for the dark and light areas. I was careful to mark areas of highlight.

IMG_3223

Next, I added Dark Purple with relatively light pressure.

IMG_3225

Then I put in some Pink.

IMG_3228

I didn’t take any other pictures before I was finished, but the majority of completing the sketch was layering and blending the colors to reduce white flecks showing through. I blended out using a colorless blender pencil and then went over some areas again and blended in lighter areas with White or Light Peach. I also used Light Peach for the top of the onion. I used Indigo Blue and 50% Warm Gray (in addition to Dark Umber) for the shadow underneath the onion and layered Crimson Red on top of Dark Purple for the part of the onion that is showing through the skin.

IMG_3235

It’s not perfect, but I definitely think it’s an improvement over the original! I’m glad that I started over and I will have to keep that in mind in the future, especially when it’s not just a sketch. I think part of the reason I don’t typically start drawings over is fear that I just can’t do it. But if I keep trying, it ultimately gives me the chance to produce something better. And that’s totally worth it.

Sketch: Figures

A friend shared this two-and-a-half hour video with me (originally a live figure drawing session on Facebook at 4pm on January 5, 2018; from Friday Evening Figure Drawing by Draw This)

This inspired me to do a figure drawing session, something I haven’t done in many years. It felt like being back in art class, sitting and just practicing and getting lost in the process. It’s been a while since I had that feeling, as I’ve been trying to produce finished pieces to get a portfolio together. I don’t claim to be any good at figure drawing, but I had fun!

I did these sketches in pencil on Newsprint paper (18×24). I apologize for the quality of the photos; I really need to get a better setup for taking pictures of my art one of these days.

The session began with twenty one-minute poses. I started by sketching out the shapes of the torso and limbs. Once I had a general idea of where everything went, I traced the contours for definition and to add detail, such as the placement of muscles. I’ve always been very slow at drawing, so the whole concept of timed poses was a challenge for me. In the first session I didn’t get very far since the poses were so short. I was able to get further more easily as time went on and I got more comfortable (I couldn’t even complete the first pose), but the poses themselves also seemed to get harder and harder. Great model!

IMG_3133IMG_313420 x 1 minute poses

Next came ten two-minute poses. It was nice having more time to spend on each pose, but unfortunately that didn’t help me much with proportions. I think I had the most trouble with getting the length of the torso right.

IMG_3135IMG_313610 x 2 minute poses

I had the same torso issue with three five-minute poses. I think I did the best job on the one in the center. With the five minute poses I had a chance to add some very basic shading.

IMG_31373 x 5 minute poses

Next up were two ten-minute poses. The model held a stick, creating even more interesting poses. I wanted to try a few different things, so I concentrated on shading with the time I had left on the first pose and focused on the model’s face in the second. (The poses were separate, but I wanted to continue with the same piece of paper.)

IMG_31392 x 10 minute poses

The final pose was fifteen minutes long and the model sat in a chair (I imagine it would be quite hard to stand very still for fifteen minutes). She did move a little occasionally but not so much that I felt it affected my ability to do the drawing.

IMG_31401 x 15 minute pose

I would have loved to have had more time to flesh out many of the poses, but so is the nature of live figure drawing. Yes, I could have paused the video, but that sort of defeats the purpose of the type of practice I was going for. All in all, I feel that I had a productive and enjoyable session and I’m looking forward to doing it again. I definitely recommend the video series, and it’s great that the video continues to be available after the official live session.